SONGBIRD

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Many of us “bloggers” have talked about what prompted us 
to write a specific piece. Be it a book, a poem, an article or 
something visual that caught the eye.

I find it interesting to learn about you and how your conscious
and subconscious work together to trigger a story. There are as 
many different ways as there are writers and no work would exist
without some inspiration. This is my belief.

My  poem ‘Songbird’ below came to me in the morning two days
ago. The word SONGBIRD just came and I felt that compelling feeling
to pick up my notebook. I wrote what you see below without thinking 
or stopping – this time even without editing. 

That it was written in first person I cannot explain. The “ I “ could be a male or female.

The hidden message that seems to be there I can still only
guess at, hopefully it will come clear as it otherwise is strange.

So, this time the source of inspiration comes after the poem.

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SONGBIRD

A songbird landed on my hand
looked at me and sang,
sang from her pure heart;
With delight I watched and listened

But didn’t join in
nor give her even a crumb,

Next day she came back
pecked at my hand, then sang,
the most wondrous song

I didn’t say a word
nor give her a crumb,

I was delighted and told my friends
but what about the bird
that sang her heart out

I just didn’t think of her
Didn’t give a crumb,

One morning she sat on my hand,
she didn’t sing,
Just looked in sadness
moving her head back and forth,

Then she flew; higher and higher
I never saw her again.

Finally I understood my selfish ways
I hope she found someone who knew
how to love.

I will forever miss this soulful bird.

© miriam ivarson

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64 thoughts on “SONGBIRD

    • Thank you for your comment Bernadette. I felt more confused in this particular instance of how and why I was ” told” to write this. I am not sure you can seek inspiration, isn’t it more that we have to be open when it arrives?
      Miriam

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Thank you Jim and lovely to see you here. I agree with you about that
    last photo. I trawled long among free images for the kind I was looking for.
    This one is almost ethereal in its beauty.
    miriam

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Interesting how just a word coming, sometimes seemingly out of the blue, can prompt a flow of images and associations. I admit to following the same path in my own verses at times. The spontaneity, letting the words control their own form and sequence, can be all the better for recording them quickly before they are lost and then not tinkering with them too much afterwards. I can tell by the smooth flow of your poetry that this was not produced with a struggle, but with inspiration and joy. Lovely work, Miriam. I believe s/he was telling you to put words to your feelings.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you Roland for your deeply considered and helpful answer. I am delighted that you also can feel the same from just a word or prompt. I have thought so whilst reading some of your poems. It is an amazing feeling when it sort of writes itself. I like you saying with inspiration and joy. Joy I felt whilst writing it. Reading it after I felt it was sad in some ways but she flew away free.
      Your last sentence amazed me and I felt a strong truth in that.
      miriam

      Liked by 1 person

  3. This is a sweet and melancholy poem, Miriam, perhaps indicative of something moody in your own heart, or maybe deep seated concerns over other issues. Given your explanation, perhaps it’s something like a dream.

    Dreams come from our subconscious and are often motivated by the concerns and experiences of our recent activities or our longtime worries. But they aren’t always realistic and the underlying motive may be difficult to determine.

    For now, you’ve written a poem that at least on its surface reminds you – and us – to consider the consequences of our actions. And that may be enough to keep alive the songbird in your heart.

    Liked by 4 people

  4. Thank you Sharon for your deeply considered response. Yes, when I read
    my poem after finishing getting ready I felt it was sad somehow. This surprised me as I felt elated when I wrote.
    Like many of us Northerners I don’t speak freely very often about sadness and sorrows. I think I need to speak up and fly as free as the bird spiritually.

    Dreams do most of the time reflect our subconscious and hidden self but this didn’t seem like a dream.
    Thanks for your last sentence, funnily the song bird sings stronger than ever now.🦋😊 .
    Miriam

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you Robin, I am glad I took this subject up as it seems there are a number of us who experience the same feeling of almost being the conduit.
      Maybe books also to some extent arrive that way. Although they need more work around the inspired idea.
      miriam

      Liked by 1 person

  5. This spontaneous poem went to my heart like an arrow Miriam! I wished each time that you would say otherwise…that you paid attention, that you would show your love…oh! why didn’t you?
    On delving deeper into your words, I realised this bird is trying to shake you out of your anguish, some thought that is too troublesome and you are holding on to it. Only such thoughts bring forth masterpieces in moments…that’s why they say pain is essential as it ennobles us.
    Thanks for sharing this outstanding outburst. I am re-reading it and drowning in the sad sea.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Wow Balroop, this is wonderful praise indeed and thank you for the deep thoughts around my poem. I so agree about the ” I ” charachter. He/she should have shown the love. Now, what if I was the bird…., it still would be sad and your wonderful last paragraph stands true.
      I do also agree with you that being able to feel pain and joy deeply is paramount in all art and certainly in poetry. ❤️
      miriam

      Liked by 2 people

  6. Hello Miriam. Enjoyed your poem. And I’m impressed that no editing took place.

    Inspiration is an amazing thing. Seems like it can come from anywhere. The inspiration for my latest story, for instance, was pretty weird, and took me by surprise.

    See you —

    Neil S.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Your mysterious inspiration connected with me.
    It could be the times, but my mind went to current issues and how we so often stress over specific circumstances far removed from us (yet affecting all of us), while doing nothing or, at the very least, speaking out.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you for your interesting comment. Yes, certainly the charachters could represent e.g. two friends, or lack of engagement in issues we feel strongly about. Hadn’t thought of the last.
      miriam

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Thank you Michael, glad you liked the poem. Hope you had a real good vacation and will be back in the swing.
    I think you also refer to the poem I wrote with your photo as a prompt.
    Thanks.
    miriam

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I’ve had a word or even lines come to me and I’ll have to write it down just like you did. It’s an exhilarating, almost giddy feeling, when the words seem to write themselves. Too many times something has sparked for me and if I’m busy or distracted I think I’ll be able to get it down at a later time, but that later time comes and there’s nothing, or the initial idea isn’t as strong, all the emotion is lost, as if the idea flew away kind of like your songbird. I guess, in a way, we have to nurture those ideas when they come. The flow of your words in this is seamless. A lovely poem, Miriam.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you for your lovely comment, I smile at how many of us get these
      moments of almost being told what to write. I agree. Leave it for later and the flow is gone even if you remember the general gist.
      My first ever poem was like that and I felt almost shaky. Called my best friend and read it out, she got silent and told me to write it up and keep on writing anything that came.
      It happened non-stop for a while until things steadied into more controlled form.
      miriam

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Phil, how true it is that learning and wisdom come with a price.
      Did the bird learn to sing to someone who could share joy and did the man/woman learn to appreciate blessings in life.
      miriam

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I love this poem Miriam and the introduction you gave to set the scene for the poetry. I like how you use the simplicity of nature and the draw into reflection. Sometimes, especially when I am listening to a piece of music, the words come to me and after writing them down the meaning is not apparent. It is only after sitting on them for a few days they start to make more sense. Maybe there is a part of poetry that doesn’t have to have meaning. As poets we may just be messengers for nature and the Universe.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks Davy for your beautiful comment. I am glad you read the introduction too as it explains my bewilderment and also that I don’t know why it came in first person. Exciting in itself really.
      Listening to music, being in nature and by water seems to trigger this for me. Maybe we relax the ‘chattering of the brain’.
      You say : ” As poets we may just be messengers for nature and Universe”
      Wonderful thought Davy and worth pondering further.
      miriam

      Liked by 1 person

      • I enjoy reading the backdrop to a poem and poet Miriam as, for me, it gives the poem more depth and meaning. The way poems and thoughts appear to us may remain one of life’s mysteries.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Ah Miriam, are not ‘Tumblers’ the most intriguing and satisfying. To me the feeding/not feeding is a red herring. Songbirds are always heralds to me, renewal/change. She came not expecting seed but to impart a message, and once you started thinking no song or pecks needed so she flew away higher and higher, which meant you had time to think about her departure. Songbirds are associated with caring, watching-over.
    A fascinating and beautiful poem Miriam, thank you.

    Liked by 3 people

    • wow Nigel, how funny. I thought of you and your word “tumblers” after I had written the poem. It is a good word you coined.
      I got a bit of goose bumps when you say : “Songbirds are always heralds to me, renewal/change “.
      There are many changes in front of me and I fret at times how it will all come together. Now you say:
      ” Songbirds are associated with caring, watching-over.”. How special.
      Thank you Nigel, hadn’t thought of this angle at all.
      miriam

      Liked by 1 person

      • To Nigel Smith and those who follow my blog,

        I want the thank you Nigel for your wonderful reading of my poem Songbird on your blog today. Plus the equally beautiful reading of Sorrow and Grief. Music accompanying is superb.
        So those of you who read this, please do head over. You are in for a treat.

        Nigel’s blog is : Voices of a Hidden Self .

        See you / Miriam

        Liked by 1 person

  12. This is so beautiful, Miriam, and so sad. All the little bird wanted was some attention. It’s a reminder that to keep those special songbirds in our life we need to acknowledge them, and thank them for their presence. Thank you for sharing this!

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Thank you Julie for your wonderful comment. I agree, we need to care for and love these little songbirds in our lives. They are in tune with universe more than we are.
    To share this gives me joy.
    miriam

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Beautiful, Miriam. I love when poems or pieces of prose just seem to appear from the air. The message seems clear that the gift of beauty requires nurturing and appreciation. A reminder to me to express my enjoyment of the efforts of others as well as to care for my own creative spirit. Lovely poem. ❤

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Thank you Diana for your lovely comment. It is fascinating to me how many
    different interpretations there are of the message. It seems the written words
    touches varies areas of the recipients.

    I do so agree with you that we need to nurture our various gifts. If not we will lose them. Our ears also need to be tuned to the whisper inside.
    miriam

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Miriam, this is a wonderful post! I love your introduction and I get goosebumps reading how the whole poem ‘came’ to you from the one word of songbird. The poem is tinged with hope and expectation, of giving of oneself and love … however sadness underpins the whole. A truly artistic and deeply philosophical work that can be read on so many levels. Thank you so much for sharing with us … and I love the beautiful images that accompany your words. Hugs xxxxxx

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you Annika for your beautiful and deeply felt and thought through comment. It gladdens my heart. Yes, I felt that mix of love and sadness too. The word Songbird made me think it was going t be a happy one.😊. As you know I love birds.
      Artistic and philosophical…., great praise from you and I treasure it. Maybe we do philosophise over many occurrences in life. What do you think?
      Hugs 💕 Xx

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you B for your kind words to me.
      Remember that I say in my intro : ” That it was written in first person I cannot explain. The “ I “ could be a male or female.”

      I am not the man or the woman speaking. Felt more like the songbird who took courage and flew higher and away.
      hug my friend
      miriam

      Like

  17. A lovely poem Miriam. I am always touched when someone or something offers up a generous insight without expecting anything in return. Unfortunately in the lives we now lead we are often too focussed on the “what am I expected to give in return” than actually listening to and accepting the insights we are being given.

    Amazing photo at the end too.

    Mike

    Liked by 1 person

    • Mike, thank you for your kind and interesting comment. Given a generous insight is a gift to treasure,
      there is never pressure on reciprocate but hopefully there will be a shared song.
      have a nice weekend
      miriam

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Wow what a beautiful poem; you really have a gift. I love how we are bloggers/writers can find inspiration in ordinary things. For me I have a good memory so I find myself writing a lot about my memories and my feelings associated with them. Like you I try not to think while i am writing and just let the thoughts come out. This really was well written and I look forward to reading more of your poems.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you for your gracious comment. As to finding inspiration in ordinary things, I feel
      it is a matter of seeing that they are not so ordinary. To see beauty or pain that might be hidden.
      I agree with your, memories, thoughts, events, snapshots of something said or seen.
      A scent, a sound….so much can trigger our flow of words.
      Miriam

      Like

  19. This beautiful poem brought tears to my eyes as I was hoping with every new stanza that finally the bird was acknowledged and fed. It’s a remarkable reflection of certain kinds of relationships, I fell. And in my heart I don’t give up – I know that the songbird will come back one day to give the “I” – whoever it might be – another chance.
    You’ve been clearly kissed by a muse that night, Miriam. 😊

    Liked by 2 people

  20. Dear Sarah, I think you are kissed by a muse yourself as your comments this morning are giving so much light and beauty. Thank you for taking the time to really read and feel.
    The Songbird was a puzzle to me, it just poured forth. I love songbirds and feed them and ..yes..even talk to them.:) I like to think this Songbird found something or somebody who could share the joy and life.

    Did you hear it being read by Nigel at. Nigel’s blog is : Voices of a Hidden Self . I think you will like it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Reading your poetry I can never help but feel all the emotions that were poured into them, Miriam. 😊 I think that’s a true gift and I’m so glad you share it here with us all – it’s like a lovely source of inspiration.
      I also feed songbirds – and talk to them! And sometimes it feels like they even talk back to me, twittering a thank you and see you tomorrow. 😄
      And I will look out for Nigel’s blog!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Sarah, you give me such beautiful thoughts and I will stay true to be worthy of them. Thank you!
        Oh, I am sure the birds sense what we are saying…..at least emotionally.
        After all there is light and love in the voice when you talk to these delightful beings. 😊💕

        Liked by 1 person

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